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Easy versus hard won

March 17th, 2016

Eleanor

I saw Brooklyn a few days ago and I am still in its thrall. Those neat drab streets of Enniscorthy, the mother and sister at the wharf, the transformation of Eilis (played by the divine Saoirse Ronan) from girl into woman and oh yes, that yellow dress.

Eilis and Jim Farrell, played by Domhnall Gleeson Photograph: Allstar/Lionsgate

Eilis and Jim Farrell, played by Domhnall Gleeson Photograph: Allstar/Lionsgate

But it was also the sense of being torn between two places which I thought Brooklyn communicated so beautifully, so viscerally, through Eilis’ character. Colm Tóibín wrote about the filming of the adaptation in the Guardian recently, saying it was about feeling the pull “between the easy familiarity of home and the hard-won familiarity of away”.

I’ve been waiting years for someone to say that so succinctly. Thank you Colm.

And here is my shameful admission: I have not read the novel the film is based on. I tried six or seven years ago and put it down after a few chapters. Why? I can’t even recall. I promise I will try again.

The plot of Brooklyn is an age-old one. Young person leaves home for new opportunities. They return changed, and must decide which path their life will take, pulled in two directions. They are forced to stop being a child and to become a person accountable for their own decisions. Eilis goes to Brooklyn from Ireland to find work, her sister has organised it for her through an Irish priest she knows there. She isn’t certain she wants to go but there are no chances for her at home. Once in Brooklyn, Eilis is brought to her knees by homesickness, but this abates when she meets Italian-American plumber Tony Fiorelli (played by Emory Cohen) at a dance. Called back to Ireland for family reasons, she is torn between whether to stay or return. Between the “easy familiarity of home and the hard-won familiarity of away”.

In other hands, this film could have become trite, I can almost hear the sappy violins crescendo, but luckily the director John Crowley (Boy A, Intermission) and the scriptwriter (Nick Hornsby) allowed the quietness, the focus on Eilis’ internal life and the small visual detail which was nostalgic without being twee.

This film does not have grand messages but small, familiar ones. Eilis is a woman of the 1950s and while she gains independence with her travel, this is ultimately a story about love. She is going to be a wife and mother. She is just not sure with whom.

Ellis working at a department store in NYC. Photograph: Allstar/Lionsgate

Eilis working at a department store in NYC. Photograph: Allstar/Lionsgate

Meanwhile she is disloyal, she keeps secrets, she has a dark moment during which she does not know which way to turn. And when turn she finally does, I realised I had been holding my breath. How close it all was. How real it felt.

Maybe part of my love of Brooklyn is because it mirrors my own struggle with homesickness, being torn between countries, having moved to Australia for love. The America I know is changed now, not least because I have changed too. But still every time I return I feel the pull. That easy familiarity. As simple as driving again on the right side of the road. Creamer in my coffee. Lemon in my tea.

At one point in Brooklyn the priest tells Eilis that homesickness is like any sickness: you get over it more quickly than you anticipate.

I would say it is more like a broken bone, even years after it has healed it will suddenly, without warning, begin to ache.

4 Comments

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  1. Sylvia #
    March 19, 2016

    Wow eleanor, your analogy of the broken bone made me tear up just as I had at the movie last night . Whilst not a personal experience for me, the movie was so moving I felt like it was a personal experience. thankyou for taking me back to the film . X

    • Eleanor #
      March 21, 2016

      Thank you Sylvia, for reading and for your comment. It’s definitely a movie I’ll watch again. X

  2. Bex #
    June 7, 2016

    That quote captures the feeling of being torn so well. And oh that familiar pain of homesickness – I love your description of the bone aching. So true. I’ll have to watch this film

    • Eleanor #
      June 8, 2016

      Thanks Bex, and thank you for reading. You’d know the feeling well, and I think you’ll love Brooklyn.

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